Thursday, September 2, 2010

Fallow Through

I heard a story on TED today about how if you want to achieve a goal, you shouldn't tell people. This runs counter to everything I've ever heard, but apparently the science is in on this one. What happens is, your brain is satisfied with the warm fuzzies you get from thinking about getting what you want.

As a secretive and superstitious person, this makes an awful kind of sense to me.

What I need to know, now, is how to get my mojo back. Scratch that, I'll be sitting here with no goals of any kind. Hear that, universe?

8 comments:

  1. OK, I went to TED and listened to Mr. Sivers and you are right...this is NOT how it's supposed to work! Nor was the short clip enough to convince me of the validity of the science. But I did like the idea of telling someone the efforts you are making in moving toward your goals in order to get a little help and encouragement. So, I'll see you in workshop!! That's certainly a step in achieving our goals!

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  2. To paraphrase Robert Collier, "Our subconscious minds have no sense of humor and can't tell the difference between reality and an imagined thought or image. What we continually think about eventuality will manifest in our lives."

    To know and to do are those dichotomies in life we are always dueling with, believe me, I have been playing this game longer than most and conquering those sabotaging thoughts that slip into our stream of consciousness and the language we use when we are joking can block the way to achieve our dreams.

    Having a close friend on the same wave length helps us watch our language in order to not confuse the inner mind as to what it is we really want. To it a joke is no different than an ideal.

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  3. Oh,I wish I had some well researched comment to make about this, but I only know how this works for me..
    I tell at least 2 people, not the group loudmouths, just two friends ( at the beginning, never family) then I feel like I HAVE to make it happen. My pride is almost intolerable and once I have told someone, I'd rather eat slugs that give up and have someone give me that , uh,huh, yeah, I remember that dream of yours, look.

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  4. I am more of a mind now that this science is fooey. (That's a well-researched technical term!) I wonder if it only applies to unverifiable things? "I'll be more generous," might be easier to imagine I had done than, "I'll give a thousand dollars to the Home for Unwed Cats." So, if I want my plans not to gang aft agley, I should lay them down in specifics (or take on a little of Susan's fierce pride.)
    --
    My word verification was "watinagg" which is a good phrase for conscience, I think.

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  5. Quoting Burns made me look it up: check out this very nice explanation of Burns' poem, "To a Mouse."
    http://www.electricscotland.com/burns/mouse.html

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  6. Ahha! I enjoyed reading To A Mouse. I've avoided Burns for obvious reasons and did not realize this was the source of the proverb. Thanks!

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  7. And I raise you Whitman, to whit: "A mouse is miracle enough to stagger sextillions of infidels."

    Not that any of us are infidels. Just the opposite, I'd say. But here we are.

    Maybe I'll write on my own blog again someday, but today, I take (as is often the case) comfort in Writing Wench.

    And in the face of one of my favorite felines, now restored to its rightful place.

    Love,
    jme

    AAAHHH! My word veri is FABLE!! How fabulous. I am absolutely taking this as a sign from the gods--or the mice--or The King.

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  8. I forgot to ask to be alerted to comments. So I will . . .

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Wench, I want to say this about that...